Thursday, October 05, 2006

Game 8 LIVE Commentary - Topalov scores 1st win


The game is about to start and so far no Press Releases or Protest letters for game 8. Let's hope for some good chess!

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Be2 (This is the Meran, a switch from the Catalan. This is actually one of my favorite viariations and I won some nice games with this line.)


8...Bb7 9.O-O (One of the ideas is as Yasser said: "The idea is that in numerous variations, White can play for Nf3-e5 and Be2-f3, when the Bishop is more useful on f3 than on d3." If Black does not play b4 then e4 is the plan.)

9...b4 10.Na4 c5 (Be7 is another line here.)

11.dxc5 Nxc5 (This is the kind of position that is perfect for Kramnik with little chances to lose. I am very surprised of Topalov's opening choice today and actually in this match.)

12.Bb5+ (Another choice is 12.Nxc5 Bxc5 13.Qa4+ and White has a good position.)

12...Ncd7 13.Ne5 Qc7 14.Qd4 (Kramnik is spending a lot of time for this move. A common question is doesn't Kramnik know this opening line? Yes, of course. However, this is the type of position where he needs to decide to continue in a more aggressive manner or more positional. This is why sometimes you see a GM spend significant time in the opening. In fact, the same player sometimes would choose a different continuation depending on who his / her opponent is. - Thanks DK for the correction!)

14...Rd8 (Topalov instantly responded with this move. If White takes the pawn on a7 with 15.Qxa7 Black can play Bd6 and he has compensation for the pawn. I can't imagine Kramnik playing a sharp line like this.)

15.Bd2 (A questionable choice by Kramnik. 15.Nxd7 would be another choice, perhaps a better choice.)

15...Qa5 (Topalov once again responded instantly. This seems to be a new move. 15...a6 has been played by Cvetkovic - Bagirov.)

16.Bc6 (The amazing thing is other lines would give Black a very good position. 16.Bc6 is the strongest continuation. Here 16...Be7 is the strongest reply and White would have to continue with 17.b3 O-O. Black is OK with this position.)

16...Be7 (It seems to me that Topalov has this line all prepared at home. This is dangerous territory for Kramnik as he has to find the best lines on the board. But he seems to do find so far in this match.)

17.Rfc1 (Kramnik spent quite a bit of time for this move. Black has a few decent options: O-O or Bxc6. We may actually have an exciting and imbalance game today.)

17...Bxc6 18.Nxc6 Qxa4 (So basically we will see a Rook for 2 minor pieces - 2 knights type of game once Vladimir captures the Rook on d8. In my opinion, this is the most exciting game to date. The position will be sharp and we will see if Kramnik can play tactical chess or not. Some people tend to have the wrong impression that Vladimir is not good with this style. He is! He just prefers to play more positionally.)

19.Nd8 Bxd8 20.Qxb4 (This is the safest way to continue with Queens off the board. Vladimir is comfortable with Rook+Pawn for 2 Knights. 20...Qxb4 21.Bxb4 Nb6 to stop Rc8. Black is fine with this endgame.)

20...Qxb4 21.Bxb4 Nd5 22.Bd6 f5 (Yasser Seirawan says: "I'm not sure what Vladimir thought was "attractive" about this ending. With Kf7 and Bb6 in the offing... Black looks very good." I agree with Yasser. I like Black too but I would not say Black's position is very good. I think Black is slightly better. However, this is exactly what Topalov is hoping for, a chance to win with Black, even if it is a small chance.)

23.Rc8 (Now I am expecting Black to play 23...N5b6 to stop Ra8.)

23...N5b6 (By the way, for those of you who do not have access to ICC, PlayChess or another server, you can see the LIVE game here.)

24.Rc6 Be7 (Around half of the viewers like Black's position. The other half like White's position. This is why this game will be exciting. Unbalance positions are very hard to play. If I need a win, I would take Black. If I need a draw, I would take White. What does that mean? It means that even though Black may not be better but Black has chances. What it also means is Black's position is more difficult to play and White's position is easier to play. Therefore, if you want a draw, you would want to choose the easier side to play which is White.)

25.Rd1 Kf7 (Both of these moves are expected.)

26.Rc7 (It does not matter which side you like better, the bottom line is we will see an exciting endgame.)

26...Ra8 (Fritz suggested trading Rooks for Black but I think Topalov made the right decision by keeping his Rook on the board if he wants chances to win.)

27.Rb7 (I like a5 here as Black.)

27...Ke8 (I do not like this move very much. It just wastes a tempo if White captures the Bishop. White has a few options now play 28.f3, 28.Bxe7 or just retreating the Bishop to g3.)

28.Bxe7 Kxe7 (Black just wasted a tempo with Ke8 last move. That is why I prefer 27...a5.)

29.Rc1 a5 (Finally! Who is actually playing for the win here? Topalov is definitely not going for the draw but I do not think Kramnik minds his position either.)

30.Rc6 Nd5 (This pair of Knights is giving Kramnik a nightmare. Hard to break them up.)

31.h4 (The big debate on all servers is which side is better. GM Boris Avrukh said: "Zagrebelnyi is commenting on 64.ru writes: I am sure he is Topalov is playing for a win here , I think he is wrong, I would prefer White here." Karjakin likes White. Radjabov likes Black. John Fedorowicz likes White, I like Black...and the debate continues...)

31...h6 32.a4 g5 33.hxg5 hxg5 (The players cranked out these moves very fast. Now GM Nataf joins the list who likes Black but it is still a 50-50 split.)

34.Kf1 g4 (This is the kind of position that you cannot rely on computers to evaluate. As you can see, many of the GMs like White and many like Black. It is a matter of preference. Some play minor pieces better, some play Rooks better, some like balanced endgames and some like unbalanced positions. If you want to get better, this is the kind of position you have to learn to play out on your own.)

35.Ke2 Nf6 36.b3 (I am sure Kramnik is confident of his position right now. It's quite solid. I also think that Topalov does not mind his position.)

36...Ne8 37.f3 (White wants to trade. The less pieces on the board, the closer to a draw. So Topalov needs to decide on 37...g3 or gxf3.)

37...g3 38.Rc1 Nf6 39.f4? (Gata Kamsky said: "Once black setups rook somewhere on d2 and Nd7, Nf6, Black is better." I believe this move is the beginning of Kramnik's downfall. To allow the Knight to get in the e4 and g4 squares defy positional chess logic.)

39...Kd6 (All of a sudden, many observers started to shift their opinion to liking Black better. As I said earlier, Black has chances to win and it is the side you would want to have if you need to go for the win. This kind of endgames is hard to evaluate, even for GMs.)

40.Kf3 Nd5 (Kramnik has to be very careful now. His position requires extra care. I wish I can see Kramnik's face now in this position. Or better yet, I wish we can scan his brain to see his pattern of thinking in such position. He is one of the most solid players in history.)

41.Kg3? (This is a horrible move and it seals Kramnik's fate in this game. As I said many moves ago, Black had chances. You just have to have a feel for this kind of position. You only the feel for it by playing out positions like this hundreds / thousands of times. That was part of my training when I was younger.)

41...Nc5 (The best move. White now has an extremely difficult position. Even if White did not blunder with 41.Kg3, he would have had a very bad position. The funny thing is only about 7-8 moves ago, some were questioning my sanity when I said I would pick Black if I need to go for the in. Now, everyone seems to change their minds. If White plays 42.Rb5 then Ne4+ then Rg8 and White's position collapses.)

42.Rg7 Rb8 (42...Nxe3 would have been better.)

43.Ra7 (If Kramnik loses this game, I am afraid this match will become an even bigger circus. Topalov is usually a slow starter. What if Topalov can bounce back with a couple of wins? Will the match be called off due to the game 5 fiasco? What a mess!)

43...Rg8+ 44.Kf3 (Not the best response but everything loses.)

44...Ne4 45.Ra6+ Ke7 (All the White pawns are about to fall. The position is looking extremely bad for Kramnik now. Unless there is a complete collapse by Topalov like in the first 2 games, Topalov should score his first on the board victory today.)

46.Rxa5 (Now 46...Rg3+ 47.Ke2 Rxe3+ 48.Kd1 Nxf4 -+. Basically, just about everything wins.)

46...Rg3+ 47.Ke2 Rxe3+ 48.Kf1 Rxb3 (Black is completely winning here. All he has to do is pick up all the pawns and there is not much White can do about it.)

49.Ra7+ Kf6 50.Ra8 Nxf4 (White has no defensive plan here. He can only hope for Black to blunder.)

51.Ra1 Rb2 (Mate threats are coming.)

52.a5 (Here comes a checkmate for Black starting with Rf2+ 53.Ke1 Nd3+ 54.Kd1 Nc3#)

52...Rf2+ and White resigns giving Topalov the first win on the board. This sets up for a very interesting scenario. Can Topalov pull off a string of wins now that the momentum has switched? Will this now be just a legal battle because of game 5? Would we even have this discussion if Topalov did not have a melt down in game 1 and 2? We shall see! I just hope the match will not stop now. The excitement has just begun on the board! You can read full analysis here.
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253 comments:

1 – 200 of 253   Newer›   Newest»
Howard said...

Good Morning Susan & Chess Fans

Game 8, lets hope we witness some chess brilliance today from whomever is able to employ it.

Let the moves be the News

Renzo - IncaKing @ ICC said...

It seems like with 11...Nxc5, Topa is traying to have Kramnik play for a win after 12.Nxc5 Bxc5 13.Qa4+ Kf8.
Will Kramnik follow this variation?

Henry said...

I think psychologically the opening is more comfortable for Kramnik! We have another symmetrical pawn structure.

Anonymous said...

Dang, I really thought that Topalov would play the winning 1...d6!? this time.

David said...

Rybka is suggesting f4 and giving it a += evaluation ... However I have a hunch that Kramnik will play 14. Nxd7 Nxd7 15. Bd2 (the evaluation is still += but with fewer pieces - I wuld go for this line)

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Who is Rybka?

vvchess said...

"I am very surprised of Topalov's opening choice today and actually in this match."

We are all surprised by everything Topalov has done in this match.

Looks like Topalov came to this match without a plan!

How else does one explain his chess so far?

robert said...

where have you been lately? rybka is a new chest engine, very sophisticated. Different than Fritz.

David said...

Rybka is the best chess engine at he moment ...

D.K.

David said...

Here you have the raiting list for chess engines: http://www.computerschach.de/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=238

D.K.

Anonymous said...

If Kramnik plays 14.Nxd7, I think Topalov will go all out with 14...Nxd7 15.Bd2 Rd8 16.Rc1 Qe5 17.Qe2 g5!?

PWJW said...

Hiarcs 9 is giving Qd4 (eval. 0.81), which has been played a few times according to the online Chessbase database. f4 is second choice (eval. 0.48) and Nxd7 comes in third (eval. 0.25). And it's Qd4!

Howard said...

Are we still in the Opening Book , so far ?

Marc Shepherd said...

Looks like Topalov came to this match without a plan!

That's a little too glib. Had it not been for blunders in the first two games, he'd be ahead in the match at this point. Obviously the blunders count, but no GM plans on blundering. From a planning point of view, Topalov's strategy produced the opportunities he needed. He has failed to capitalize on them.

What we may be seeing is a failure to adjust plans after the match goes much differently than he expected.

PWJW said...

I don't think so - I can only find one game that matches this now, from 1974. Hiarcs is eyeing up the a7 pawn...

David said...

I'm sorry but I can't help myself (please don't get angry at me ...)

The phrase is wrong:

"This is why sometimes you see a GM spend significant time in the opening. In fact, the same player sometimes would choose a different continuation depend on who his / her opponent."



This is why sometimes you see a GM spend significant time in the opening. In fact, the same player sometimes would choose a different continuation depending on who his / her opponent is. -> I think this is correct.

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Topalov will get huge compensation for the sacrificed pawn. (If Kramnik takes it)

Anonymous said...

the same works without GM
"I would spend a lot of time for this move. A common question is doesn't I know this opening line? No, of course. However, this is the type of position where he needs to decide to continue in a more aggressive manner or more positional. This is why sometimes you see a me spend significant time in the opening.
JG

Anonymous said...

Huge compensation? I dunno. My engine is still showing it as an advantage for White, with Qxa7 as the best move.

David said...

I think Bd2 might be even more dangerous for white then Qxa7, the line is:
14... Rd8 15. Bd2 Qa5 16. Bc6 Bxc6 17. Nxc6 Qxa4 18. Nxd8 Kxd8 *

Once (or if) black develops after this white is doomed.

D.K.

Anonymous said...

"My engine is still showing it as an advantage for White, with Qxa7 as the best move."

Don't use engines, use your brains instead.

Marcus Lemmond said...

Bd2? what the hey is that?

Anonymous said...

Ask the engines...:}

David said...

Waw Kramnik went for the most aggressive line, my assessment of the line might be wrong ... Today I think we are going to see a great game!

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Yes! Chess prevailed over gossip!

Anonymous said...

Do you think Kramnik had a chess micro-chip implanted in his head during his semi-retirement in the past few months ?

Marc Shepherd said...

Don't use engines, use your brains instead.

It ought to be needless to say that I used it too. I didn't see huge compensation for Black after Qxa7. Why don't you respond to the actual comment, instead of presuming what people are thinking about?

Anonymous said...

No I don't beleive.

Anonymous said...

D.K.,

Topalov shouldn't take the bishop on c6, rather play ...Be7 and castle.

David said...

Now I see Be7, not very hard to find you only have to consider the line with the exchanges Bxc6 17. Nxc6 Qxa4 18 Nxd8 Kxd8 ... and then you see that capturing with the king is bad ... hence Be7 and no more problems in later development - or at least I think so ...

D.K.

Anonymous said...

"Why don't you respond to the actual comment, instead of presuming what people are thinking about?"

Hey, never any offense meant!! I can't see the board, difficult to comment.

David said...

Interesting Rybka switched back to Bxc6 (after 2 min of "thinking" - depth 18). I am still of the opinion that Be7 solves all blacks problems...

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Program Rybka is stronger than the latest version of Fritz?

Howard said...

DK . . .

how fast is the CPU that you are using to run your chess engine on ?

Marc Shepherd said...

Interesting Rybka switched back to Bxc6

Rybka's not aware of match strategy, psychology, etc.

David said...

I found an interesting line ... I think it is winning for white (Rybka doen't agree but anyway ...)

16... Be7 17. Rac1 Bxc6 18. Nxc6 Qxa4 19. Nxd8 Bxd8 20. Qxb4 Qxa2 21. Ra1 a5
22. Rxa2 axb4 23. Bxb4 *

And white has a nice passed pawn while black still neds to spend some time to develop ...

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Hi, Just a suggestion. Would you be able to place the commentary on its own page? (Or maybe it is, and I just don't know how to get there.) When I refresh my page, it has to reload all the items on this huge page with all its pictures. It would be better if I was just refreshing the commentary only. Thanks for the insights. Peter

Anonymous said...

Let me repeat my question:
Is Rybka stronger than deep Fritz ?GM Kramnik is supposed to play Fritz in a month or so.

David said...

Rfc1!, I think that Rac1 is prettier! :D

D.K.

Howard said...

http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2006/10/game-8-live-commentary.html

vishy said...

Why not Nxe7 Kxe7,Qxb4+ Qxb4,Bxb4

David said...

The line with b3 isn't the best continuation because black is able to castle for one pond ...

18... Qxa4 19. b3 Qa6 20. Nxd8 Bxd8 21. Bxb4 Nd5 22. Bd2 O-O 23. Qc4 Qb6 24. e4 N5f6 25. Be3 Qb7 *

D.K.

Anonymous said...

is it possible to somehow have a board, too? I am not good at blindfold commentary. Thank you.

David said...

To Howard:
P4 2,6Ghz 1gb ddr2 ram.

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Howard, Thanks for the internet address of the live commentary page. Peter

Anonymous said...

"Most people tend to have the wrong impression that Vladimir is not good with this style. He is! He just prefers to play more positionally."

I think Kramnik is weaker in tactics than Topalov. But how will we ever know?

Murr said...

Watch it here, anonymous.

David said...

To Marc Shepherd,
I know that Rybka isn't aware, but the point was that "it?" saw that black was fine and culd "unwind" and then simply have material advantage ... (but there is still the posibility that Rybka is wrong :D)

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Murr, THANK YOU! Now it's much better!!!

David said...

What is Kramnik waiting for?

D.K.

Howard said...

Chessboard here . . .

http://www.worldchess2006.com/main.asp?id=1063

Marc Shepherd said...

I think Kramnik is weaker in tactics than Topalov.

The games in this match so far certainly do not suggest that.

David said...

To Marc Shepherd:
I wouldn't jump to any conclusions, Kramnik plays his share of sharp openings ... therefore he can't be that bad + he has a few spectacular wins in less then 30 moves -> which proves he is capable of tactical play. I think that the difference is only that Topalov is more well-known for his sacrifices ...

D.K.

David said...

Sory mate haven't read your entire comment.

D.K.

Marc Shepherd said...

It wasn't me who said Topalov was stronger in tactics, but somebody else.

Howard said...

Kudos to Murr for posting the Link 1st

jimMD said...

Kramnik is considering 19.b3 Qb5 20.Nxe7!? kxe7 21. Bxb4+ im sure. but at the end of the day (as kasparov likes to say) he may just take on d8.

vishy said...

"I think that the difference is only that Topalov is more well-known for his sacrifices ..."

Its a myth about Topa.He is under the gun in this match,and he is taking conservative route.

Anonymous said...

22. Bd6?

Kramnik can certainly do better than that!

Anonymous said...

"The position will be sharp and we will see if Kramnik can play tactical chess or not. Most people tend to have the wrong impression that Vladimir is not good with this style. He is!

19.Nd8 Bxd8 20.Qxb4 This is the safest way to continue ...."

:))))) So Kramnik prefer to play sharp chess or not??!!

Murr said...

How do programs evaluate this endgame?

jimMD said...

my suggestion is 20...Qxb4 21. bxb4 Nd5 22. Bd6 f5! and black can sort his position out

Anonymous said...

Note that Topalov still has 0-0.
The crucial is the moment when he will use it.

jimMD said...

the reason i like my variation is the knight will remain on d7 to guard some key dark squares and black will simply not castle but move king to f7 and Bishop to good diagonal on f6.......white rc8 always met by n5b6! i think black is good to go here and id rather play black!!

Anonymous said...

23...Nb6 should be a response I guess.

jimMD said...

ah topalov chose my idea ! :) i am happy . ill be back later to see how it turned out. have fun people

irishspy said...

16.Bc6 (The amazing thing is other lines would give Black a very good position. 16.Bc6 is the strongest continuation....

Oh-oh! He must have gone to the bathroom again! :D

jimMD said...

oh .....excellent opening preparation by Topalov today! black cannot lose and has longshot chances to seize the initiative.

PWJW said...

Nice work JimmD! I have to rely on my engine - my brain is really not up to this - plus I am supposed to be working ;)

David said...

Rybka's evaluation of the current position is -0,06 depth 18.

D.K.

Anonymous said...

Amazing !
Topalov seemed not to intend to use 0-0 at all.
It was a trick to puzzle Kramnik.
Probably the trail of Topalov's home preparation follows.
Fire on the board follows folks!

PWJW said...

Im getting 0.03, but it is one of those unbalanced sort of positions that a chess engine is unmoved by, but as human players, we know how hard it is to maintain the equilibrium. Now should Vlad swap off the Bishops here? I'm not sure that would be a good idea...

Anonymous said...

"If I need a win, I would take Black. If I need a draw, I would take White." So, Black can create winning chances but White can draw easily? This does not make much sense to me

abangkl said...

Good game by Topalov so far.

I admire the game, not the (cry baby) man.

PWJW said...

Yeah, Kf7 looks more likely than 0-0 now. Bring on those fireworks, we need them!

hoddy said...

blacks good should win from here

David said...

Rybka is suggesting Rd1 so at leat my engine thinks exchanging bishops isn't that bad, I thnik Kramnik has no other choise, if he doesn't exchange then Topalov gets dominance over the board ...

D.K.

Howard said...

Not only do we have a material imbalance , there is a time imbalance as well.

Any thoughts ?

Anonymous said...

don't understand the Polgar comment:
if win needed - prefer black position
if draw needed - prefer white position

is this suggesting that a black win attemt is risky ?!

Marc Shepherd said...

Amazing !
Topalov seemed not to intend to use 0-0 at all.
It was a trick to puzzle Kramnik.


I don't think Kramnik was fazed by that. In a position with White's queen and light-squared bishop off the board, castling is unimportant.

abangkl said...

"Howard said...

Not only do we have a material imbalance , there is a time imbalance as well.

Any thoughts ?"


I wonder what was Kramnik doing during game 8 preperation. He is down in time and risk to get into time trouble as yesterday.

David said...

Here is one posible line that favours Kramnik:
25... Kf7 26. Rc7 Rc8 27. Rxc8 Nxc8 28. Bxe7 Kxe7 29. Rc1 Ncb6 *

D.K.

Anonymous said...

ok what now plan-wise? should topalov exchange down to R vs N+N or keep as many pieces on board as possible?

pwjw said...

Good point Howard, though Vlad managed yesterday with some time difficulties. What about Rc8, RxR, BxB, KxB - after the simplification, does this make it easier for Vlad or Topa? (Eval. in favour of black, -0.27)

David said...

Actually after the exchanges Rybka thinks white is doing better: +0,09 depth 19.

D.K.

pwjw said...

David, you're way ahead of me! I don't have much of a feel for these types of positions - I think of a pair Knights as being difficult to coordinate in an endgame, but against as single active piece, hmmm...

David said...

Don't forget about the pawn Kramnik has!

D.K.

Marc Shepherd said...

Engine evaluations in endgames are notoriously unreliable, but it appears to me that a trade-down simplifies the defense, and is therefore in Kramnik's interest.

Anonymous said...

Dear Susan,
I do appreciate your quick and insightful comments. What I believe to be a blunder is your remark "If I need a win, I would take Black. If I need a draw, I would take White." Mathematically, the probability that White reaches a draw is equal to the probability that Black reaches a draw. Likewise, the probability that Black wins equals the probability that White loses. If you like Black if you have to win, there is no reason to strictly prefer White if you need a draw.
Cheers,
Björn

Anonymous said...

RB7? I figured a4 is way more logical. Any thoughts

David said...

If hypothetically speaking Kramnik could make one night occupied by his passed pawn he could then use the rook to create weakneses on the king side and maybe win another pawn (or at least that is what I think).

D.K.

pwjw said...

For sure Marc - and the extra pawn does make things interesting. Seems to me that Topa's king is more usefully positioned at the moment. Any thoughts on what it behing Rb7 - can't quite see it myself?

Marc Shepherd said...

What I believe to be a blunder is your remark "If I need a win, I would take Black. If I need a draw, I would take White."

Susan can speak for herself, but I think she is referring to the overall psychology of the game, which is a factor that mathematics cannot calculate.

pwjw said...

Yes a4 did seem to have some promise, although after a5 is there any significant change? I does make the b pawn rather awkward too.

Murr said...

Thanks for the program evaluations everybody!

pwjw said...

No problem Murr, I'm just not sure how long I can keep it up before having to do some work...!

Anonymous said...

is there anywhere some info about what topalov said at the press conference?

Murr said...

I know the feeling...

David said...

If after 29. ... a5 30. Rcc7 then I thnik Kd6 solves black problems because if Ra7 black can simply play Rd8 and blacks a pawn is in no danger ...

D.K.

Anonymous said...

what about 30.Rc6?

pwjw said...

29... a5, 30. Rc6 looks OK, although Nd5 seems safe enough

David said...

Rybka is looking at Rcc7 as the only move but isn't his a loss of tempo? I don't undersand it ... Can someone explain why Rcc7 is a good move when after Kd7 b3 Rd8 it has to go back to c2 -> Rc2?!

D.K.

pwjw said...

... and I haven't found anything on Topa's press conference, just Vlad's

Murr said...

78% of the moves in this game have been predicted in the comments.

Michael C.M. said...

Magyar says

Bjorn, your Math is not exact

There are many variables you are overlooking.

White could have a position where 10 different moves would lead to a draw

Black could hava positon where only 3 moves would lead to a draw

Therefore, White can draw easier.

Likewise, There could be 2 moves that are winning for black and only one that is winning for white.

Susan, thanks for providing an additonal view to the great broadcast on Chess.fm (they even have real music today!)

Magyar

David said...

Rc6?! Ok now I don't have the slightest idea of what is Kramnik thinking?!

D.K.

georgi said...

... and I haven't found anything on Topa's press conference, just Vlad's

they only allowed game questions, and those were incorporated in the game analysis on the official site. that was mentioned somewhere...

Howard said...

78 % of the Comments have been Predicated by the Moves

Nekthen said...

Not using a computer but I liked 30 Rc7 instead of c6. Certainly stops Nd5

pwjw said...

Nice one Murr! David, I am not so sure either. The engine is starting to come out with rather meaningless (to me at least) moves, like h3 or h4, so it is out of ideas to! I was just about to post this, when I saw that Vlad has played h4 - oops!

David said...

To pwjw:
My engine was suggesting h4 too, I think there must be a logic behind it I just can't see it ... anyway I think taht rc6 was a small mistake (then again Kramnik might surprise us ...)


D.K.

Ciaran said...

What's the time control? Is it 40 moves in 2 hours?

Anonymous said...

Winning plans for black and white, please! Especially for black, who has three pieces (R+2K) to coordinate and a pawn less. I'd rather prefer white here, two rooks are easier to coordinate and at least he can try to mobilize his extra pawn on the queen side. Trading rooks might also be a good idea for white.

David said...

I wuld have played:
30... Nd5 31. a3 a4 32. Kf1 *

This makes much more sense to me ...

D.K.

pwjw said...

I believe it is 40 in 2hrs, but I would like someone else to confirm that. Client just phoned me - looks like I better do some work! I'll drop by again later. Current eval. -0.23 favouring a5, Rb8 or g6... But now they have moved again!

David said...

Now that I see this position h4 is starting to make sense (jup I knew there was some logic in it :D)

D.K.

Cato Elder said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Marc Shepherd said...

I believe it is 40 in 2hrs, but I would like someone else to confirm that.

Yes, 40/2; 20/1; G/20'+30"

vishy said...

Hi D.K.

From http://www.e3e5.com/eng/petersburg/competitions/article.html?250

31.h4! Also very good - white has no direct play, thus he prevents possible capturing space on the kingside that otherwise could be started with 31...g7-g5!

Cato Elder said...

After 31 h4 if Topalov had played Nb4 threatening the Rook and capturing the a2 pawn he could have cleared up some territory for his advancing a pawn.
His move 31 h6 was weak I think.

Anonymous said...

King walks to B5 white has very good winning chances.

David said...

Rybka thinks that they are equal(ish) -0.25 depth 21, but I think that is is easier to see a plan for white thaen for black (black is a bit tied up at the moment) ...

D.K.

David said...

To vishy,
the open h fle gives white an additional + I think. (that is the first think I considered, but you are absolutely right about the contoling of space, I sometimes tend to focus on one side and ignore the other ...)

D.K.

David said...

Now I understand Rc6 too (it is all about the contol of space and about hindering your opponents moves). (well better late then never :D)

D.K.

vishy said...

Hi D.K,
whats the point behind Nf6?

Miguel said...

well, two knights can play and defend each other without much risk agains a rook. The only winning chance for white is a5 pawn. I think Topa is better, even that I wanna his lost!

Johnywh said...

36. ...Ne8
THIS i do not understandat all

David said...

Is Topalov preparin Kd8 with the idea of exchanging some pieces?!

D.K.

zabbura2002 said...

Hi Susan, do you think white should try to isolate the g pawn or not?

Anonymous said...

White could create a pass pawn with the help of her king.

David said...

I tnik that Ne8 was to prepare Kd8 because after Kd8 white can no longer capture the pawn on e6 because after Nc5 he doesnt have a check on d6 anymore ... but probably it is somethng else ... :D

D.K.

Chris said...

It's difficult to evaluate this position.
On the one hand black might have better chances to creat a (small) advantage, on the other, it looks easier for white to draw (black can go wrong easier!).

The exchanging of pawns might definetly be in Kramniks favour and so it should be his plan

JB. said...

dear susy i had some problems so im just hooking, seems an exciting game, by the way u dont necessarily have to say his/her opponent with his opponent y can understand its plural. anyway your english is better than mine.

seems an exiting game but do u think it will outpass the second game!

ok see u.

Marc Shepherd said...

I don't really see a winning plan for Black. With his pieces tied down to defending against White's rooks, how could he bring in any more artillery against the White position?

David said...

Kd6 and black pieces can move!

D.K.

Chris said...

37.f3
as expectet. In my opinion 37...g3 or 37...Sd6 38.Rxx g3 is the only way for black if he wants to reach more then a draw.

David said...

Here is a wining plan for black:

39... Kd6 40. Kf3 Nd5 41. Rb5 Ra7 42. Rd1 N7f6 43. Rc1 (43. Kxg3 Ne4+ 44. Kf3 Nec3) 43... Ra8 44. Rcc5 Rh8 45. Rc1 Ne4 46. Rxa5 Ndc3 47. Ra6+ Kd7 48. Ra7+ Kc6 49. b4 Kd6 50. Rxc3 Nxc3 51. Kxg3 Rh1 52. b5 Ne4+ 53. Kf3 Rb1 54. Ke2 Rb4 {And black wins.} *

(White might not have played the best moves but now that black has finaly played Kd6 I think Topalov is better!)

D.K.

artichoke said...

What an amazing move 36. b3 was. Almost ... computerlike.

Consider the following variation on move 40:

40 ... Nc5 41. Rb6+ Kd5 42. Rd1 mate. But it's only mate because of the pawn on b3. If the pawn were still on b2 this variation would be good for Black! And it's far from obvious at move 36 (to this human at least) that the pawn is safer on b3 than b2.

I think that 36. b3 is computer-like.

Marc Shepherd said...

I think that 36. b3 is computer-like.

Computers have a tendency to find good moves. So do GMs. It would take an awful lot more than just one "computer-like" move to conclude that Kramnik is relying on a computer.

cato elder said...

Kramnik is not known to blunder in this series, I think he will hold out for a draw but as Ms Polgar said, he should tread carefully.
Topalov isnt in great form either, so a blunder from him is quite possible.

Miguel said...

41.e4 and a draw!

David said...

To artichoke:
I will have to disagree the computer likes 36. Rcc7 depth 21, I think is is a human like move :D (the computer always plays the move that is statisticaly the best in his pool of variations, if it is not a forced mate the computers evaluation wont be that high, but it helps the human player to see a mate posibility it gives him confidence!)

D.K.

Anonymous said...

is 41 e4 playable? allows the king to go after the g pawn .. if the black rook coomes to defend it the whote rook swings to the open h file to attack it.

ChiliBean said...

Is the pawn at g3 poisioned? :)

41. Kxg3?

pwjw said...

Dipping back in, and it looks slightly better for Topa (eval. -0.51 for Rb5, over -1 for anything else). I worry for Vlad's rook stuck out on the b-file - how can he get it back into the game? That was why I was a bit perplexed by b3, as it seemed to trap this rook...

Marc Shepherd said...

Kramnik is not known to blunder in this series....

Have you looked at Game 2?

David said...

To Anonymous:
e4 is not posible because of:

41. e4 fxe4+ 42. Kxe4 Nc5+ *

And white looses a rook.

D.K.

pwjw said...

Kxg3, Nc5 and the b file and e pawns are struggling perhaps? e4 could open things up a bit...

pwjw said...

Quite right David - missed that - similar theme to Kxg3

QM1 Todd R. Forbes (Ret) said...

Hello everyone! My opinion is today's game is more interesting than the last two. If you don't know by now, I support Topalov the player (I don't like what his manager does). It's this kind of unbalanced positions that makes the game exciting. (I personally use IM Silman's seven. they're easy to remember). I say Topalov should win because he is ahead in the imbalances + Space + Material = everything else.

David said...

The computer now says black is winning: -+ (-1.50) depth 18 (and likes Nc5 a lot)

D.K.

daz said...

Why is Kxg3 such a horrible move?

(I am not disagreeing -- I simply don't know why.)


ALSO -- what does it mean when the rectangle at the lower left of the board on
http://www.worldchess2006.com/main.asp?id=1063
turns some color (e.g., red or turquoise) ?

pwjw said...

Kxg3 it is - could be trouble ahead - what has Vlad planned for Nc5, or do you think he has missed it - a pivotal moment in the match perhaps, or am I being melodramatic!

Anonymous said...

40.....Nc5! 41.Kxg3,Nc5 42.Rb5,Ne4+ 43.Kf3,Rg8 44.Rxa5,Rg3+ 45.Ke2,Rxe3+ 46.Kf1,Rxb3 (-+)

Matteo

Miguel said...

41.e4 fxe4 42. Kxg3 draw

zabbura2002 said...

Is Rb5 dangerous for white?

David said...

White is in big truble:

41. Kxg3 Nc5 42. Rb5 Ne4+ 43. Kf3 Rg8 44. Rxa5 Rg3+ 45. Ke2 Rxe3+ 46. Kd1 Nxf4
*

And white can resign. ( if Kramnik can defend this then he is truly unbeatable!)

D.K.

pwjw said...

My eval is -2.09 ! 41... Nd5, 42 Rh7 Nxe3, 43 Rb1 Nd5, 44 Kf4 Rb8, and the b pawn is lost. Nc5 has been played - what now for big Vlad...?

Anonymous said...

Nice coverage, thank you.

pwjw said...

Miguel, after exf4+, Kxg3, then Nc5, and with the threat of Rg8 and Nxb3 and Nd3, I think it would be hard for black to draw...

Anonymous said...

I have just joined after viewing the position after 41st white move.
At first glance I thought white was winning...But Susan said black's clearly better!?
What is going on?
White is up in material,why is black better??

David said...

Rg7 preventing Rg8+ but I don't see how Kramnik might draw now ...

D.K.

pwjw said...

.. or white even :)

Anonymous said...

Hello Susan

Thank you for all the commentary.Is it possible to get your site to refresh automatically,say every 2 minutes, so that we are updated with the latest comments.

Marc Shepherd said...

Is it possible to get your site to refresh automatically,say every 2 minutes, so that we are updated with the latest comments.

That would be highly inefficient, as Susn isn't updating every two minutes. You have a refresh button yourself. Use it.

Anonymous said...

Ooops ,sorry.Disregard my previous comment.I didn't see black has two knights,not one...
No material advantage for white.

pwjw said...

Hiarcs is suggesting RxNc5 - ouch! David in the last variation, and in this position, you are right - Rg7 is the probably the best option, but it still looks dire. Vlad is taking his time - I think his difficulties are dawning on him now...

Henry said...

I'm sure MOROZEVICH would greatly prefer black, even before Kxg3!!! A dream position, 2 knights....

Marc Shepherd said...

41. Nc5. This position verges on resignable. My lowly Fritz Lite is also suggesting 42.Rxc5 as the best of a bad situation.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the response March Shepherd. sorry I have a slow connection and refreshing the site is a bit of a problem. During the world cup the BBC site was refreshing site every 2 minutes but I take your point. Thanks again

pwjw said...

Yes, the position looks like it will disintegrate quickly with so many threats - and from such a stable looking position just a few moves ago. Hiarcs continues to find more promise for Black. Eval. -2.33 now.

Anonymous said...

I am a pro-Kramnik,but once again I admit Topalov confirmed what we already knew:He is a deadly dangerous black pieces player!
I'm affraid Vlady can't save this game.

QM1 Todd R. Forbes (Ret) said...

Anonymous said...
I have just joined after viewing the position after 41st white move.
At first glance I thought white was winning...But Susan said black's clearly better!?
What is going on?
White is up in material,why is black better??

It has to do with the imbalances on the board. You are right that white is up on material over all...only slightly and black is threatening to get it back. You are missing this: black has taking over critical squares by centralizing his knights. Also he now occupies a critical half open file. This give him an advantage...in imbalance! Let us see if he can convert it.

pwjw said...

Rg7 for Vlad. Hiarcs prefers Nxe3, but I think Topo's direct Rb8 should do the job just as well in the end. How long do we think Vlad will wait before calling it a day?

David said...

I would continue playig and hope black bluners (higly unlikely ... but anyway). (I kind of feel sory for Kramnik I'm feeling the pain of his position ... it must be realy horible for him right now ...)

D.K.

luca19575(ICC member) said...

black is better but if all the pawns are exchanged its a draw ,right susan?

pwjw said...

I'm agree entirely David, it must be torture to watch it slipping away - but he must play on to make Topo prove that he can finish him this time. The eval. has dropped a bit (-1.88), but still the b and e pawns look destined for a trip off the board, and the a pawn does not look like much compensation for white.

pwjw said...

luca, I think you are right in principle, but I don't think it is like to happen.

Anonymous said...

And Vlady is a bad on clock once again.All is against him in this game.

If I were him I would better resign and save my energy and health for incoming games.
Maybe he hopes Topalov will blunder again..

Anonymous said...

So, Susan, according to your comment on move number 43, do you prefer Kramnik to win, so we dont need to care about game 5?

Cheers,
Beco.

pwjw said...

44... Ne4 looks odd to me, as it allows both the b and e file pawns to stick around, but I guess the threat of Rg3+ means this is the most forceful approach?

David said...

Rybka was suggestin 44. Kh2 ... Kf3 gives black too many tempi ... Rybka is now evaluating the position as completly lost for white. (-2.01 depth 18)

D.K.

Daniel said...

Kramnik should start worrying about his time.

I hope he wins the match. I feel disgust for Topalov and his crew.

David said...

0-1 (now I wuld resign there is nothing that Topalow can do to loose)

D.K.

pwjw said...

David, your PC obviously runs a lot quicker than mine! But Hiarcs also had Kh2, though I can understand the instinct to defend the e pawn. Current eval is -2.67 (depth only 13 though!) after 46. Ra7+ Kf6, 47. Ke2, Rxg2+

Anonymous said...

Match is officially even .After game 8 we are at the begging again.
We are going to see real triller in next 4 games.
May better player win!

pwjw said...

It's horrible to watch now - just carnage! I am fairly neutral by the way - just want to see some good chess - but this is brutal... Hiarcs just hit -4

Anonymous said...

thats it...
somehow 37.f3 was the first step on the wrong path, wasn't it?

daz said...

48. Kf2 ... is listed In S. Polgar's blog as having *happened*, but it is mysteriously not listed on
http://www.worldchess2006.com/main.asp?id=1063 (at least not for 2 minutes later)

David said...

mate in 5!

irishspy said...

All that's left for Black is to ,op up the last pockets of resistance.

I wonder if Team Kramnik will raise the issue of the game 5 forfeit, now that the match is tied?

pwjw said...

Mate in 4

Anonymous said...

I agree with you daniel.
Topalov team is disguisting,but it is not Topalov's fault to have such snake in his camp (Danielov).
Probably he didn't know what was at snake prepeared to do just destabilize Vlady.
He is a magnificent player .Just like Vlady I admire his chess skills.

vvchess said...

Topalov's first win. Yes.

Finally the match is interesting to watch because of the chess.

David said...

The mate (and it is a nice one!)

52... Rf2+ {Black wins 0-1} 53. Kg1 Rxg2+ 54. Kf1 Rf2+ 55. Ke1 Nd3+ 56. Kd1 Nc3# 0-1

D.K.

artichoke said...

I'd imagine that Topalov's fast play kept Kramnik riveted at the board toward the end of the game. Good show, Topalov!

QM1 Todd R. Forbes (Ret) said...

Yippie!!!!! Topalov finally wins one...let the three ring circus begin...bring in the clowns(FIDE, Team Kramnik, and Danailov)!

ChiliBean said...

Topolav's first win and with black pieces....woooow! Masterful use of his knights!

irishspy said...

Topalov team is disguisting,but it is not Topalov's fault to have such snake in his camp (Danielov).

Unless you're saying Danailov was forced on Topalov, it most certainly Topalov's responsibility. You're responsible for whomever you hire.

lancelot said...

Dear Susan.

It is really great that you share your analysis with us.

Thank you very much

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