Rich As A King

Sunday, March 23, 2014

White to move and mate in 3



By Lubomir Kavalek

Vasily Smyslov, 88, became the world chess champion in 1957, defeating Mikhail Botvinnik. Aside from having a great career as a practical player, Smyslov also produced more than 100 endgame studies, the most of any world champion. In his teens he tried his hand at composing problems. In 1935, at age 14, Smyslov created the following (above) problem (White: Kf8, Qa8, P:c4,d3,e3,g4; Black: Kf6,Nf1,P:a7,c5,e6,f7,g5) in which white mates in three moves.

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Qh1 threatening Qh8#

Nh2 Qa1+ e5 Qa6#

Ke5 Ke7 threatening Qe4#

Ng3 Qa1#

Anonymous said...

Qh1 threatening Qh8#

Nh2 Qa1+ e5 Qa6#

Ke5 Ke7 threatening Qe4#

Ng3 Qa1#

J L CoRoNa G said...

1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,f5 3. Qh8++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,f6 3. Qe4++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Nd2 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Nf3 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Ng3 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Nd2 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.
1. Qh1,Nf3 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.
1. Qh1,Ng3 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.

J L CoRoNa G said...

1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,f5 3. Qh8++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,f6 3. Qe4++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Nd2 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Nf3 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Ke5 2. Ke7,Ng3 3. Qa1++.
1. Qh1,Nd2 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.
1. Qh1,Nf3 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.
1. Qh1,Ng3 2. Qa1,e5 3. Qa6++.

Anonymous said...

I must say that I am not usually a fan of puzzles like this where one side has a huge material advantage and is easily winning. Most chess players would simply play 1.Qf3 and pick up the knight and be up a queen.

However the upside of puzzles like these is that it helps to unlock the true power of the pieces so they can be used at their full potential. Also it reinforces the old chess quote from second world champion Emanuel Lasker "when you see a good move, look for a better one".

I must say that I did find this particular puzzle quite enjoyable.

1.Qh1 travelling the maximum distance along the long diagonal with the threat of 2.Qh8+ Kg6 3.Qg7#
if 1...Nh2 to block the path then we can use the "weakness of the last move" principle to take advantage of the newly uncovered route with
2.Qa1+ e5 (2...Kg6 3.Qg7#)
3.Qa6#
if 1...e5 to create an escape square for the king then
2.Qc6#

If the king tries to make a run for it with
1...Kg6 then
2.Qh8 anyway with the unstoppable threat of 3.Qg7

The most interesting variation occurs when the black king runs to e5
1...Ke5
2.Ke7 setting up the mating net by covering the f6 and d6 squares and threatening 3.Qe4#
if 2...Ng3/d2 to protect the e4 square then again it leaves the path open for
3.Qa1#
if 2...f5 as an alternative way to cover e4 then
3.Qh8#

I do think that this is quite an interesting puzzle and shows off the maneuverability of the queen with these long distance moves and jumping from corner to corner. Good puzzle from 14 year old Smyslov.

Pranav Dandekar said...

1. Qf3+

If 1...Kg6
2. Qxf7+ Qh6
3. Qg7#

If 1...Ke5
2. Ke7 (threatening mate via either Qf6 or Qe4).

Anonymous said...

1-Qa7 is forced mate in max 3

Variations

2 qa1 or qxf7 or ke7 depend on black move

Anonymous said...

Qf3+ Ke5 Ke7 any move from black Qe4#
Qf3+ Kg6 Q×f7+ kh6 Qg7#

bogtalk said...

nice problem. found solution. howcan I verify it?

bogtalk said...

nice problem. found solution. howcan I verify it?

bogtalk said...

nice problem. found solution. howcan I verify it?

Anand Gautam said...

Qh1!
Neat problem as it involves all four corner squares (a8, h1, a1, h8)!!

Tim said...

Looks to me like the right move is 1.Qh1.

Prof.S.G.Bhat said...

1.Qh1 Ke5
1.... Kg6 2.Qh8 followed by 3.Qg7#
1.... e5 2.Qh6#
2.Ke7 f5 or Ng3 or Nh2 or Nd2

2.... Nxe3 3.Qe4#
3.Qa1#