Friday, April 04, 2014

Checkmate in 4



White to move and checkmate in 4!

Euwe vs. Najdorf (Zurich, 1953)

23 comments:

Yancey Ward said...

Pretty simple- the need to prevent the king from reaching e5 more less gives away the first move, and the rest fairly easy:

1. Qh8 Kg5 (only legal move)
2. Qg7 Kh5 (Qg6 3.Qg6#)
3. Bf7

The hardest of the moves to find- it deflects the queen from guarding g4:

3. .....Qf7 (Qg6 4.Qg6#)
4. g4#

Jospaul Davis said...

1Qh8+ Kg5 2 Qg7+ KXh5 3 Bf7+ QXf7 4
g5+

mshroder said...

Am I missing something? This doesn't seem to take a Euwe to solve.

1. Qh8+ Kg5
2. Qg7+ Kxh5
3. Bf7+ Qg6
4. Qxg6#

Mark

Anonymous said...

From what I see,

Qh8+ Kg5, Qg7+ Qg6, Qxg6++

I am sure I am missing something crucial here, but it does look like mate in 3 to me.

-Patrick.

Anonymous said...

From what I see,

Qh8+ Kg5, Qg7+ Qg6, Qxg6++

I am sure I am missing something crucial here, but it does look like mate in 3 to me.

-Patrick.

Chesspro said...

Very instructive problem. Not easy, but no so difficult either. Thank you for the problem. I hope you come check my twitter @chesspro_usa.

From the patzer said...

1. Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+ Kxh5 3. Bf7+ Qxf7 4. g4#

Anonymous said...

Fairly simple mate in 4 as the entire variation is forced.

1.Qh8+ is the critical move as it prevents the black king from accessing the e5 escape square and now it is forced into a mating net
1...Kg5
2.Qg7+ Kxh5 (2...Qg6 3.Qxg6#)
3.Bf7+ Qxf7 and now that the queen has been deflected
4.g4# mating with a pawn

Notice how elegantly white's 6 pieces (queen, bishop, knight and the e6, g3 and h5 pawns) coordinate against the inadequate black defence with only queen and pawn. Black's minor pieces are just chilling out on the queenside while the main action is going on far away from them. So although material is even at the beginning of the puzzle, white has a huge material advantage where the critical action is taking place.

AJAX said...

1.Qh8+ Kg6 2. Qg8+ Kxh5 3. Bf7+ Qxf7 4. g4#

Denis Gauthier said...

Mate in 3 starting
1.Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+

Denis Gauthier said...

Mate in 3 starting
1.Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+

Denis Gauthier said...

Mate in 3 starting
1.Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+

Denis Gauthier said...

Mate in 3 starting
1.Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+

Anonymous said...

Mate in 3 starting
1.Qh8+ Kg5 2. Qg7+

fajac said...

1. Qh8+ Kg5
2. Qg7+ Kxh5
2. ... Qg6
3. Qxg6#
3. Bf7+! Qxf7
4. g4#

Anonymous said...

1. Qh8+..Kg5
2. Qg7+..Kxh5 (if 2....Qg6. 3. Qxg6#)
3. Bf7+....Qxff7 (if 3....Qg6. 3. Qxg6#)
4. g3#

Harry

a la recherche du flow perdu said...

1.Qh8+ Kg5 2.Qg7+ Kxh5 3.Bf7+ Qxf7 4.g4#

finally i find sth quickly! thank you

Bhimsen Kulkarni said...

1. Qh8+ kg5
2. Qg7+ Kxh5
3. Bf7+ Qxf7
4. g4#

Anonymous said...

1. Qh8+ Kg5
2. Qg7+ Kxh5
3. Bf7+ Qxf7
4. g4#

Anonymous said...

Qh8!...Kg5,Qg7....Kh5,Bf7 and after...Qf7, G4! check mate.

Anonymous said...

Qh8+ Kg5. Qg7+ Qg6. Qxg6# in 3 moves

Jeremy Wawrejko said...

It can be checkmate in 3 moves but you are forgetting that the opponent is trying to avoid losing a big piece while escaping it. So you have to factor in the concept that black is making their best moves in a winless situation: hence 4 moves to successfully mate.

Jeremy Wawrejko said...

It can be checkmate in 3 moves but you are forgetting that the opponent is trying to avoid losing a big piece while escaping it. So you have to factor in the concept that black is making their best moves in a winless situation: hence 4 moves to successfully mate.