Rich As A King

Friday, July 04, 2014

Checkmate in 5



White to move and checkmate in 5! Enjoy!

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

1.Rf8+!.

>A-1......N/Bxf8.2.Qf7#

>B-1....Ke7.2.Qxg5+!

>>B1-2...Kxf8.3.Qxd8#
>>B2-2....Kd6.3.Ne4+.Kc7.4.Qxd8#
>>B3-2....Bf6.3.Nf5+.Kxf8.4.Qg8#
>>B4-2....Nf6.3.Nf5+!.Kxf8.4.Qxg7+.Ke8.5.Qf7#

Key was how to activate the pinned N? Remove the pin by capturing the R while maintaining the mating attack!
There is a variation in line B4 which I will post shortly.

Harry

Anonymous said...

Continuing from my previous post I note that in my B4 line
>>B4 line is not correct solution due to
1.Rf8+.Ke7.2.Qxg5+.Nf6.3.Nf5+.Kd7! When mate will be longer and unsure. (Instead of 3....Kxf8.4.Qxg7+.Ke8. 5.Qf7#).
The correct B4 line that results in mate in 5 is as follows:-
>>B4-1.Rf8+.Ke7.2.Qxg5+.Nf6.3.Rf7+!! Preventing the king from escaping! Now
>>>B41-3...Ke8.4.Qe5+.Qe7.5.Qxe7#
>>>B42-3...Kd6.4.Qf4#!!! The beauty of this last line is that all white pieces are back where they started from ( in this puzzle) while in the meantime black has lost his rook while advancing his N to f6 and his king has reached d6 to be mated!

Harry

PROF.S.G.BHAT (and not BATH) said...

1.Rf8+ Ke7
(1... N(or)Bxf8 Qf7#)
2.Qxg5+ options are
(a)2... Bf6
3.Nf5+ Kxf8
4.Qg8#
(b)2.... Nf6
3.Rf7+ Ke8

(3.... Kd6 4.Qf4#)
4.Qe5+ Qe7
5.Qxe7#
(c)2... Kxf8 3.Qxd8#
(d)2.... Kd6
3.Ne4+ Kc7
4.Qxd8#

pht said...

I first notice that this would be mate in 1 if not white had a rook too many.
So I instinctively play:
1. Rf8 Ke7 (Nxf8/Bxf8? Qf7#)
2. Qxg5+ Kxf8
3. Qxd8#

So I guess:
2. ... Kd5 (enforced)
3. Rxd8
without knowing if this is the fastest, but for me it is right know, I have no more time today...

GL said...

1.Rf8+ Ke7 (1.-Nxf8 or 1.-Bxf8 2.Qf7++)

2.Qxg5+ Nf6
(2.-Kxf8 3.Qxd8++)
(2.-Kd6 3.Nf5+ Kc7 4.Qxd8++)
(2.-Bf6 3.Nf5+ Kxf8 4.Qg8++)

3.Rf7+ Ke8 (3.-Kd6 4.Qf4++)

4.Qe5+ Qe7 5.Qxe7++

Anonymous said...

1.Rf8+
If Kf8, then Qf7+ mate
1. ... Ke7, so no mate in 2 moves
2. Qg5+
If Kf8, then Qd8+ mate
2. .... Bf6
3. Kf5+ Kf8
4. Qg8+ mate in 4

2. .... Kf6
3. Qg7+ Kd6
4. Rd8+ Kd7
5. Rd7+ mate

2. ....... Kd6
3. Nf5+ Kc7
4. Qd8+ mate

Yancey Ward said...

Rf8 jumps out immediately as a way to clear the f7 square for the queen:

1. Rf8 Ke7 (Nf8/Bf8 allows Qf7#)

And now it was a question of whether to play Qf7 or Qxg5. One leads to mate, the other leads to a decisive material edge (and force mate probably, but I couldn't make it work in 5 moves total, so stopped looking). Continuing:

2. Qg5 Nf6 (alternatives follow)
3. Rf7 Ke8 (Kd6 4.Qf4#)
4. Qe5 Qe7
5. Qe7#

Finally, the alternatives at move 2 for black are all shorter mates:

2. .....Bf6 (Kf8 3.Qd8#)
3. Nf5! Kf8
4. Qg8#

Or...

2. .....Kd6
3. Nf5 Kc7 (Ke5 4.Qe3#)
4. Qd8# is a pretty mate.

Rf8 said...

1.Rf8+ Ke7 2.Qxg5 Nf6 3.Rf7+...(3...Ke8 4.Qe5+ Qe7 5.Qxe7# ) 3...Kd6 4.Ne4+ Nxe4 5.Qf4#

Anonymous said...

A) Rf8! Ke7
Qg5 Kd6
Ne4 Kc7
Qd8 check mate.
B) Rf8 Ke7
Qg5 Nf6
Qg7 Kd6
Ne4 check mate.
C) Rf8 Ke7
Qg5 Bf6
Nf5 Kf8
Qg8 check mate!

Anonymous said...

1 Rf8+ Bf8 or Nf8
2 Qf7#

1 Rf8+ Kf8
2 Qd8#

1 Rf8+ Ke7
2 Qg5+ Kf8
3 Qd8#

1 Rf8+ Ke7
2 Qg5+ Bf6
3 Nf5+ Kf8
4 Qg8#

1 Rf8+ Ke7
2 Qg5+ Nf6
3 Rf7+ Kd6
4 Qf4#

1 Rf8+ Ke7
2 Qg5+ Kd6
3 Ne4+ Kc7
4 Qd8#

1 Rf8+ Ke7
2 Qg5+ Nf6
3 Rf7+ Ke8
4 Qe5+ Qe7
5 Qe7#

Anonymous said...

Is there a mate in 2?

1. Rf8+ Bxf8
2.Qf7++

or

1.Rf8+ Nxf8
2.Qf7++

Or am I missing something obvious?